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  •  The Google Assistant has long been available on most modern phones and tablets. But given the fragmentation of the Android ecosystem, many older devices will never get the newer versions of Android that feature built-in support for the Assistant. Google is now bringing support for its voice-activated helper to phones running Android 5.0 and tablets running Android 6.0 and 7.0. Read More
    Dec 13
  •  Google’s made a number of tweaks since announcing Android Go back at I/O in May. The lightweight version is finally ready to launch, albeit with a slightly altered name. The OS is launching with the release of Android 8.1, now carrying the decidedly less catchy Android Oreo (Go edition) title. Read More
    Dec 4
  •  Content distribution is hard. You want to keep enough of it close enough to favorite customers so they don’t have to wait and reduce latency for new data. That’s why WICASTR created the SMART Edge Platform, a system for sending content to the very edges of the network, including compatible local routers and access points. “WICASTR is an ‘all in one solution’ for… Read More
    Dec 4
  • Erik Huggers Vevo, the music video service backed by major record labels, just announced that its CEO Erik Huggers is departing. Huggers previously worked at the BBC, at Verizon (which owns TechCrunch) and elsewhere. He joined Vevo in 2015. Under his leadership, Vevo was working to become less reliant on YouTube (which was its major syndication partner) by developing more apps and products like the… Read More
    Yesterday, 11:58
  •  It looks like Wag may get another huge injection of cash following a big financing round earlier this year, according to a report by Recode, and also based on what we are hearing. We had heard a bit ago that Wag was looking to raise around $100 million, which the Recode report also suggests. But it now looks like Softbank is in talks to invest around $300 million in the dog-walking app.… Read More
    Yesterday, 10:37
  • Photographer EyeEm is unveiling new tools to help the brands and marketers using the site to source their images. Underlying these tools is a technology called EyeEm Vision, which we described in-depth earlier this year. The goal is to expand image recognition so that it’s not just identifying the objects in the photo, but also its aesthetic qualities. EyeEm’s co-founder and chief product… Read More
    Yesterday, 10:19
  •  I’ve been holding a few micro meet ups over the past few years and thought I’d start it up again in honor of token/ICO mania. I’d love to hear what you all are working on in the New York area so we’ll all meet at Union Hall in Brooklyn next Wednesday at 7pm. The event is very informal and we’ll plan the next few months of micro-meetups during the event. My goal is… Read More
    Yesterday, 05:50
  •  “There are two types of competition for us at Loot: the banks and the money management apps,” Loot founder Ollie Purdue tells me. The U.K. startup, founded in 2014 while now 24 year old Purdue was finishing up university, offers a digital-only current account aimed at students and millennials. Read More
    Yesterday, 01:00

engadget

  • There's a good reason why security analysts get nervous about bundled third-party software: it can introduce vulnerabilities that the companies can't control. And Microsoft, unfortunately, has learned that the hard way. Google researcher Tavis Ormand...
    one hour ago
  • Remember when "Harlem Shake" musician Baauer said he'd take down FCC chairman Ajit Pai's video marking (and really, trivializing) the death of net neutrality? He meant it... although his effort didn't last long. The Verge notes that Baauer's label Ma...
    2 hours ago
  • Bitcoin values are skyrocketing, and North Korea appears to be trying to profit from that virtual gold rush. Secureworks reports that the Lazarus Group (a team linked to the North Korean government) has been conducting a spearphishing campaign again...
    4 hours ago
  • We can just imagine CDC personnel still shaking their heads after finding out that they can't use certain terms in official documents for next year's budget. According to The Washington Post, the Trump administration has prohibited the CDC from using...
    5 hours ago
  • Google's ongoing quest to curb fake news now includes sites that are less than honest about their home turf. The company has updated its Google News guidelines to forbid sites that "misrepresent or conceal their country of origin" or otherwise are a...
    7 hours ago
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  • After years of writing one-off articles and technical books for all the major venues, I recall the day in late 2007 when I was asked if I would like to write a weekly column for InfoWorld called Enterprise Windows—a dream come true and a wonderful privilege, to be sure.

    My first column was titled “Save XP? Why bother?,” which took an at-odds position directly against InfoWorld’s popular “Save XP” campaign. I received about 100 comments (many of them too nasty and profane to quote). If I was going to press on, I needed to do two things. First, grow a thicker skin (after wiping away the tears). Second, keep telling the truth from my perspective, though that would mean being at odds with readers at times, my editor at times, with fellow IT professionals at times, and with even Microsoft at times. I did so, to the best of my abilities, for nearly a decade.

    To read this article in full, please click here

    Nov 30 '16
  • I’ve read many stories that say IaaS is the future of computing. I disagree. All IaaS does is take the ghosts of networks past and shove them into the cloud. Granted, there are a few benefits in IaaS—mainly that it’s not all legacy infrastructure running in cloud VMs. But when I think of the future of computing, and more specifically the future of cloud computing, I see SaaS offerings like Office 365 as the last “aaS” standing.

    In other words, I see IaaS and PaaS as interim technologies, not as the long-term future. They’re cloud-based halfway houses for the datacenters that IT has long focused on. But the move to SaaS means you won’t ultimately need to run anything like a datacenter, whether locally or in the cloud.

    To read this article in full, please click here

    Nov 18 '16
  • Microsoft has formally unveiled Teams, its long-rumored competitor to the popular Slack and Atlassian HipChat business messaging platforms. So how do you enable it in your organization?

    Assuming you have an Office 365 plan that includes Teams (most do), go to your Office 365 portal’s Admin settings, click the Services & Add-ins option, scroll down to the Microsoft Teams option (shown in Figure 1), click it, and set the switch to On. You’ll then get a variety of settings to choose from; the default is for all options to be enabled with the exception of bots.

    To read this article in full, please click here

    Nov 9 '16